“Gender in Corporate” – Macquarie University, Monday 12 October 2015


I will be delivering this talk to the Economics, Commerce and Finance Society (ECFS) at Macquarie University on Monday 12 October, 2015.

What does diversity actually mean and what is the link between diversity and increased organisational performance. This session will take you on a journey to explore how we have arrived at this point and how societal and cultural pressures affect the way that we have created our corporate environments.  Lets strip away the buzzwords and the favourites in the gender diversity discussion like pay gap, women’s leadership and mentoring and see what that actually translates to in real terms and why things aren’t changing as quickly as we might like.    Susanne Moore will discuss some of the findings in the resources industry through her research and consulting using the Diversity Program Review Framework (DPRF)and the concepts of Gender Economics.  Find out what you can do in the new economy and why it is important for both men and women Lead in the Female Economy* by understanding the way that diversity will impact the ‘new business transformation’.

*#imputtingmyhandup to Lead in the Female Economy is a program of The Centre for Gender Economics and Innovation which will be launched at the end of October 2015.

ABOUT THE CENTRE FOR GENDER ECONOMICS AND INNOVATION

The Centre for Gender Economics & Innovation aims to be the global leader in bringing a “Gender Economics” lens to understand and improve business performance and enable the sustainable management of complexity (diversity).  The Centre uses a proprietary framework, the DPRF to assess an organisation’s diversity, innovation and performance capability on a maturity scale against international benchmarks.  Would you like your organisation rewarded?

ABOUT SUSANNE MOORE

Susanne is the Founder and Chair of The Centre for Gender Economics and Innovation (C4GEI™) and is credited with developing the emerging fields of Gender Economics (macro) and Diversity Economics (organisational). Now a Sociologist after a career in ICT and business, she has a focus on Gender, innovation and performance at an organisational level.  She is the creator of the Diversity Performance Review Framework or DPRF, currently used in the Australian Resources industry to ‘recognise’ (AWRA Recognised) organisations as a ‘Women’s Employer of Choice’.  She is conducting a research project on ‘The Profit Impact of Organisational Gender Diversity programs’, and brings practical business experience coupled with academic rigour to her consulting practice around Gender Economics.

CONTACT INFORMATION – www.centreforgendereconomics.org

For Media Enquiries and Further Information contact:

 

Susanne Moore

Founder & Chair, Centre for Gender Economics and Innovation

0439 420 897

susanne.moore@gendereconomics.org

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“Gender Economics: new resources and ways of thinking”


Susanne Moore

Susanne Moore

A write up about my recent talk to EPWN Madrid about “Gender Economics: new resources and ways of thinking” http://lnkd.in/gMY3uj

I had a great time in Madrid, thank you to EPWN!

I will be Speaking at PMIQ Chapter Meeting & Christmas Drinks – Brisbane December 12, 2012


What is Gender Economics and Diversity Economics and how will it affect Executive Managers and Project Managers

alt Gender Economics and Diversity Economics are emerging fields of study, and with so many nations in economic distress the pressure is on to tap into new resources and ways of thinking. Organisations are looking for new and innovative ways to progress and create shareholder value and as the available workforce changes organisations need to transform at an increased pace, and managers must develop new skills to manage these complex environments. Susanne’s research “The profit impact of organisational gender Diversity programs” will compare Gender Diversity Program frameworks for effectiveness, and identify and evaluate linkages to organizational profitability.In Susanne’s opinion, Gender Economics is the new Business Transformation, the next major resource, and will open a channel to increased innovation and creativity through Diversity of Thought and the ability to maximise the management of these complex environments.Whether you are a projet/program/portfolio manager, or a C level executive, join us as we hear Susanne talking about Gender Economics as the new Business Transformation, the next major resource, that will open a channel to increased innovation and creativity through Diversity of Thought and the ability to maximise the management of complex environments.For more information about the research go to http://gendereconomics.com/2012/10/16/diversity-economics-research-the-profit-impact-of-organisational-gender-diversity-programs/

PMI QUEENSLAND

Venue: Tattersall’s in the Tattersall’s Arcade, corner Queen and Creek Streets in Brisbane.

Dress Code: Please remember the business dress code for Tattersall’s: Jacket and tie with ‘ladies equivalent’; no denim please. Tattersall’s does enforce this dress code.

Date: Wednesday,  12 December 2012

Time: 05:45 PM to 08:00 PM 05:45 PM Refreshments for a 06:00 PM start

Cost: PMIQ  Members: Free.  Guests are welcome: $10 inc GST

Capacity: 100

For more details and to book for the PMIQ Event

DOWNLOAD THE PRESENTATION HERE

Research Proposal now complete and looking for sponsors


Title: “The profit impact of organisational gender Diversity programs”

Executive Summary:

This study will compare Gender Diversity Program frameworks for effectiveness, and identify and evaluate linkages to organizational profitability.  It will focus on the effectiveness (or otherwise) of Gender Diversity Programs (GDPs) within organisations in an effort to explore their relationship with the recruitment and retention of women in senior leadership roles.  The aims and objectives of this research are;

  1. To establish a link between Gender Diversity Programs and profit;
  2. To develop a repeatable framework for the measurement of this effectiveness;
  3. To develop benchmarks that support the framework;
  4. To prove a link to organisational profitability as a starting point to further study into the impact of gender on economies, i.e.: Gender Economics[1].

This proposal is the first part of a wider study to test the theory and viability of further research into Gender Economics and Diversity Economics by first establishing a link between Gender Diversity programs and organisational profitability.  Gender Economics is an emerging field of study that builds on the theories of diversity and promotes the value of gender balance, particularly in the area of innovation and creativity.  It recognises the ‘direct input’ of women to the economy and extends the theory that the discipline of economics ”could be improved by freeing itself from masculine biases” (Ferber, Nelson 1993: 24).  Diversity Economics focuses on the organisational economics of diversity programs and follows the concepts of Economic Diversity,  ”as a way to achieve economic stability” (Wagner 1993) .

The second part of the study, will take the established link between Diversity Economics and profitability further to develop quantified economic models proving the case for Gender Economics using a cost benefit analysis.

Background to the Research:

Many forward thinking organisations are undertaking Diversity programs in a bid to attract and retain the right people and they must harvest a diverse talent pool to stay competitive.  This talent pool includes women, ethnic groups, Gen Y and Gen X and the instigation of programs to tap into talent in the aging population.  This study will focus directly on Gender Diversity Programs, which create an organisational culture where gender inequalities are minimized.

Value of the Research:

Apart from estimated gains in productivity and profitability linked to an increase in gender balance, few empirically tested metrics currently exist to prove the success of these programs on profitability.

The importance of the research means that;

1)      By quantifying the impact of these programs on organizational profit, it is felt that more woman will have access to decision making roles and the ability to actively forge company strategy [1];

2)      New ways of thinking can be harnessed in the areas of creativity and innovation, vital to the growth potential of many global economies [2];

3)      A greater pool of skilled resources is accessible as a direct result of proving the effectiveness of gender diversity programs [3].

4)      Organisations can measure the impact of program outcomes through understanding the business benefits of a diverse gender mix, as well as measuring the impact of the programs’ performance through earned value analysis.

Establishing metrics and financial models to monitor the progress of gender diversity programs will help substantiate their effectiveness (or otherwise) on company profit.  This study will build on current evidence to substantiate quantitative findings.  Studies by the European Commission (2005), “found that only 30% of companies have systematic measurement and evaluation processes in place for their diversity initiatives”.  These measure quotas, targets or program performance but do not provide a causal link to profit.

PLEASE CONTACT ME TO READ THE FULL PROPOSAL.


[1] Gender Economics is an emerging field of study, see www.gendereconomics.com with the first annual conference being held in Madrid Spain in 2008

[1] Gender Equality as Smart Economics: A World Bank Group Gender Action Plan (Fiscal years 2007–10), 2006

[2] U.S Secretary of State Hilary Clinton ”tapping into the innovation and creativity of women”, and cites Boston Consulting Group survey 1“Women are indeed the world’s third largest emerging market after China and India.”  [The survey] concludes “women will control $15 trillion in global spending by the year 2014 and by 2028 will be responsible for about two-thirds of all consumer spending worldwide.”

[3] http://www.bitcdiversity.org.uk/best_practice/diversity_in_the_downturn/index.html

“The prize for employers who are willing to tackle and challenge the current status quo could be huge.  The total benefits to the UK economy of reducing the gender segregation of jobs and increasing women’s employment has been estimated as anything up to a massive £23 billion. It could raise output in the UK by an equivalent 2% of Gross Domestic Product”


My Research Proposal


Title: “The profit impact of organisational gender Diversity programs”

Executive Summary:

This study will compare Gender Diversity Program frameworks for effectiveness, and identify and evaluate linkages to organizational profitability.  It will focus on the effectiveness (or otherwise) of Gender Diversity Programs (GDPs) within organisations in an effort to explore their relationship with the recruitment and retention of women in senior leadership roles.  The aims and objectives of this research are;

  1. To establish a link between Gender Diversity Programs and profit;
  2. To develop a repeatable framework for the measurement of this effectiveness;
  3. To develop benchmarks that support the framework;
  4. To prove a link to organisational profitability as a starting point to further study into the impact of gender on economies, i.e.: Gender Economics[1].

This proposal is the first part of a wider study to test the theory and viability of further research into Gender Economics and Diversity Economics by first establishing a link between Gender Diversity programs and organisational profitability.  Gender Economics is an emerging field of study that builds on the theories of diversity and promotes the value of gender balance, particularly in the area of innovation and creativity.  It recognises the ‘direct input’ of women to the economy and extends the theory that the discipline of economics ”could be improved by freeing itself from masculine biases” (Ferber, Nelson 1993: 24).  Diversity Economics focuses on the organisational economics of diversity programs and follows the concepts of Economic Diversity,  ”as a way to achieve economic stability” (Wagner 1993) .

The second part of the study, will take the established link between Diversity Economics and profitability further to develop quantified economic models proving the case for Gender Economics using a cost benefit analysis.

Background to the Research:

Many forward thinking organisations are undertaking Diversity programs in a bid to attract and retain the right people and they must harvest a diverse talent pool to stay competitive.  This talent pool includes women, ethnic groups, Gen Y and Gen X and the instigation of programs to tap into talent in the aging population.  This study will focus directly on Gender Diversity Programs, which create an organisational culture where gender inequalities are minimized.

Value of the Research:

Apart from estimated gains in productivity and profitability linked to an increase in gender balance, few empirically tested metrics currently exist to prove the success of these programs on profitability.

The importance of the research means that;

1)      By quantifying the impact of these programs on organizational profit, it is felt that more woman will have access to decision making roles and the ability to actively forge company strategy [1];

2)      New ways of thinking can be harnessed in the areas of creativity and innovation, vital to the growth potential of many global economies [2];

3)      A greater pool of skilled resources is accessible as a direct result of proving the effectiveness of gender diversity programs [3].

4)      Organisations can measure the impact of program outcomes through understanding the business benefits of a diverse gender mix, as well as measuring the impact of the programs’ performance through earned value analysis.

Establishing metrics and financial models to monitor the progress of gender diversity programs will help substantiate their effectiveness (or otherwise) on company profit.  This study will build on current evidence to substantiate quantitative findings.  Studies by the European Commission (2005), “found that only 30% of companies have systematic measurement and evaluation processes in place for their diversity initiatives”.  These measure quotas, targets or program performance but do not provide a causal link to profit.

PLEASE CONTACT ME TO READ THE FULL PROPOSAL.


[1] Gender Economics is an emerging field of study, see www.gendereconomics.com with the first annual conference being held in Madrid Spain in 2008

[1] Gender Equality as Smart Economics: A World Bank Group Gender Action Plan (Fiscal years 2007–10), 2006

[2] U.S Secretary of State Hilary Clinton ”tapping into the innovation and creativity of women”, and cites Boston Consulting Group survey 1“Women are indeed the world’s third largest emerging market after China and India.”  [The survey] concludes “women will control $15 trillion in global spending by the year 2014 and by 2028 will be responsible for about two-thirds of all consumer spending worldwide.”

[3] http://www.bitcdiversity.org.uk/best_practice/diversity_in_the_downturn/index.html

“The prize for employers who are willing to tackle and challenge the current status quo could be huge.  The total benefits to the UK economy of reducing the gender segregation of jobs and increasing women’s employment has been estimated as anything up to a massive £23 billion. It could raise output in the UK by an equivalent 2% of Gross Domestic Product”

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Gender Diversity Research – “The effectiveness (or otherwise) of organisational gender diversity program’s on profit”


NEXT FOCUS GROUP SYDNEY MONDAY 20 AUGUST 6-8PM

As part of my Sociology degree I have commenced a year-long research project. The subject will be on “The effectiveness (or otherwise) of organisational gender diversity program’s on profit”  to see if we can come up with some metrics and measurements for quantifying the value of a gender diverse workforce on bottom line profitability.  Diversity programs are undertaken in many organizations in a bid to attract and keep senior women in leadership and although we know there are clear advantages, much of the information is empirical or intangible and difficult to measure under current business structures.

This is the first part of the study to test the theory and viability of further research into Gender Economics and Diversity Economics.

To book, please CONTACT ME

MORE INFORMATION ON MY RESEARCH
19 June 2012 UPDATE

Thanks so much to Tom Bright from Practicus who kindly responded to my earlier request for a room via LinkedIn to host my focus group in July for the first part of my research into Gender and Diversity Economics.